A new initiative to amplify foreign policy coverage by and about women.

Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte (right), Justice Minister Alfonso Bonafede (left), and Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio talk during a debate prior to a confidence vote in Conte's government in the Senate at Palazzo Madama in Rome on Jan. 19.

Italy Dives Headfirst Into Political Crisis During Pandemic

Conte’s ruling coalition is out—but that may not be the end for the prime minister.

André Ventura, the leader of Chega, delivers a speech in Lisbon on Jan. 24.

Was Portugal’s Election a Breakthrough for the Far-Right?

The incumbent president won in a landslide, but a populist right-wing candidate raised eyebrows in a country that has so far avoided extremes.

U.S. President George H.W. Bush (L) addresses delegations of the Middle East Peace Conference as Soviet counterpart Mikhail Gorbachev listens,on October 30, 1991, during the opening ceremony at the Royal Palace in Madrid, Spain.

Biden Has a Model for Dealing With Regional Fears of Iranian Missiles and Proxies

The Arms Control and Regional Security working group convened after the 1991 Madrid peace conference failed, but it offers important lessons for today.

On Women

Picture taken in January 1946 in London showing Eleanor Roosevelt attending a United Nations meeting.

After a Century of Lobbying, Women Are Finally Getting Top Jobs in Washington

Instead of talking about “binders full of women,” the new president has appointed several key female leaders in the national security agencies—but the U.S. government is still a long way from gender parity.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez watches President Donald Trump's State of the Union address

It Takes More Than a Diverse Cabinet to Advance a Feminist Foreign Policy

The Biden administration must move beyond superficial inclusion and actively promote gender equality globally while seeking to reverse the harm done in the name of forever wars.

Michèle Flournoy testifies during a hearing before the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee in Washington on Sept. 24, 2009.

Why the Pentagon Remains a Battlefield for Women

A woman was passed over to lead the Pentagon—but it’s the entire country that’s missing out.

Family members of missing Pakistanis hold photos of their relatives at a Pashtun Tahafuz Movement protest rally in Karachi, Pakistan, on May 13, 2018.

Protest and Purdah in Pakistan

How the Pashtun Protection Movement became a release valve for women’s anger.

Activists from the Population Connection Action Fund hold signs as they project a message onto the Trump International Hotel to protest the Global Gag Rule in Washington on Jan. 23, 2019.

Rescinding the Global Gag Rule Isn’t Enough

If U.S. President-elect Joe Biden wants to champion gender equality and reproductive rights, he can’t just roll back Trump-era policies.

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By Women

The president of the Central African Republic, Faustin-Archange Touadéra

Why Did the Central African Republic Declare a State of Emergency?

The country’s postelection violence threatens a humanitarian catastrophe—and a continued standoff between Russia and France for influence in Central Africa.

A Syrian child carries food through a muddy camp

No Bread, No Peace

National security experts need to put food back on the table as a core issue.

Security barricades are set up on a street ahead of the inauguration of then-U.S. President-elect Joe Biden in Washington on Jan. 20.

America Needs a New Way to Combat Disinformation Now

After 9/11, Washington formed a national commission that made the country safer. It should do the same now.

Taiwan's chemical corps personnel stand in formation during a demonstration as Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen inspects troops in Tainan, southern Taiwan, on January 15, 2021.

With Trump Gone, Taiwan Seeks Assurances From Biden Administration

But Biden and his team are likely to resist using Taiwan as a cudgel against China the way Trump did.

Biden-president-approval-global-poll-yougov-foreign-policy-HP

The World Is Glad to See Biden Take Office

In major countries, the new U.S. president starts with favorable approval ratings from day one—with the notable exception of Russia.

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